junagraphy:

I LOVE YOU (2013)
by Arjuna Capulong
Performance for video

Exhibited in SAIC Performance Art Accreditation Showcase 2013

happy valentine’s day y’all

oneyearperformance:

lllcross:

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There he comes. With two jars. One empty. One filled with black hair. He puts them on the two ends of a long, white, used cloth. There is hair on the cloth. It has been there for one year. This is the closure of a one year performance. Above the jars are candles. One candle on each jar. He lights them. There is music. Johann Strauss. One song. This one song. An der schönen blauen Donau. Played throughout the entire performance. In my mind Clockwork Orange is not far. Beautiful torture. Beauty and pain. In the middle and in front of the cloth a glass bowl filled with water, a kit of scissors and shavers, a wine carafe filled with red wine. Five disposable razors on the cloth waiting to be used.

He begins.

He takes of his shoes and his clothes. He gives them to male audience members and asks them to take care of them for a moment. Naked he steps back to the white cloth. He takes the wine carafe. He also takes a small white towel and shaving foam. He decides to go to the most left razor on the cloth. Drinks wine. Spits wine on the razor. Then he starts to put shaving foam on his legs and shaves them. He does not use water to do so. He would cut his skin and blood would drip onto the cloth next to the wine mark. It is only half a wet shave. But this is how he shaves. After having finished his legs he would continue with his genital area on the very right side of the cloth. First cutting the hair, then shaving its rest. It takes a long time. Again the wine spilling. Again no water. Again blood. He plays with his facial expression between being hacked off, boredom and slight smiles to the audience. Then the shaving procedure reaches his belly and armpits. Same procedure. This time no blood. He starts talking to the audience. About his name. His birthday. His childhood. His speech defect. He is about to reach his face. All hair on his face is died pink and blond, except his eyebrows. He takes an electric razor to shave his beard. He asks the audience how to shave his beard. Which part first. Then his eyebrows. With a disposable razor. Blood replaces his eyebrows. Finally his head. In the middle of the cloth. We were watching him for over an hour already. Same procedure. First cutting. Then wine drinking and spilling. Then shaving. Without water. Through the time passing, him drinking wine and Strauss’ never-ending beautiful blue danube it becomes difficult for him to perfectly shave. People start to tell him which parts are not shaved yet. He won’t reach the moment of shaving his head completely. Only almost perfectly shaved, he decides to end. He puts the cut hair into the empty jar. He approaches the people who took care of his clothes. He starts a small talk with them while getting dressed. The performance is finished. Relief.

What happened?

The most striking fact in this performance had been Capulongs body. His moves. His movements. His exposure. His postures. Connected to this questions arise like: How will he proceed? How will he embody and inhabit this very ritual of his? How would he move with this very own body of his? How gentle will he be with himself? What are his gestures? What are his ways and possibilities of shaving and therefore moving? Where is limitation? Where is the liminal?

He moved. Ritualistically along the cloth. He moved. Very habitually in his act of shaving. He knows his body. It is natural: One knows how to touch, how to turn, how to pull skin, how to deform body parts, how to stand up, how to sit down, how to lower your head, how to open your legs, how to reach every inch of your body. Repeatedly. This very natural behavior created a great comfort. He earned my subjective agreement with all of his gestures, my agreement with the natural presence of intimacy. He drew a thin line between art and life. Just as Theching Hsieh by whom he was inspired. He drew a different line though. He would not only show the results to an audience in the form of an exhibition, but let the audience take part in the moment of resulting by performing, by telling stories, by taking requests and helping notes from the audience, by getting un/dressed among the audience. And he entered and exited this moment through being with the audience in space. Considerably this has been comfortable for him: To be with an audience instead of taking distance. To share instead of separating. Live and present.

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A lovely entry by Lisa Stertz (SAIC Performance MFA ‘15) on my latest show, Full Body Tonsure: Closing Ceremony for a One-Year Performance at Defibrillator Gallery. 

Thank you to everyone who attended! I had so much fun with the audience! Wonderful vibes.

joncrowley:

This is worth ten minutes of your time.

I love this specifically because it challenges the (very common) assertion that rap isn’t art. And not that I think this is Jay’s best track, or that it’s a particularly good album, or even that Jay Z is the guy you’d go to if you wanted to prove that hip hop is an art form.

But there’s something beautiful about seeing one of the most successful artists on the planet turn a boastful track about referencing one’s art collection into a performance art piece that ends up including him going nose to nose with Marina Abramovic mid verse.

Picasso, Baby.

jay-z the performance artist

Categories: performance art, jay-z,
crystxl-lized:

weepling:

Maria Anwander
The Kiss
“The Kiss was given to the MoMA as a donation without asking for permission. I entered the museum as a regular visitor and gave an intense French kiss to the wall. Next to the invisible kiss I then fixed a fake label, which simulated the style of a regular MoMA caption.”

rebel type shit

art-making without consent

crystxl-lized:

weepling:

Maria Anwander

The Kiss

The Kiss was given to the MoMA as a donation without asking for permission. I entered the museum as a regular visitor and gave an intense French kiss to the wall. Next to the invisible kiss I then fixed a fake label, which simulated the style of a regular MoMA caption.”

rebel type shit

art-making without consent

(Source: hifas)

Categories: performance art, moma,
via bordellp

rebekahseok:

lilboobs:

i loved this part of star wars

omg

what’s happening what is this is that a microphone wtf?

I’ve never seen anything like this before but now I want to see it in a performance art piece.

(Source: lipstixxx)

Categories: lol, performance art,
It’s ya girl Kaitlyn Sass performing “The Genesis and Debut of Mistress Maxine” at Defibrillator Gallery #chicago #performanceart #art  (at Defibrillator Gallery)

It’s ya girl Kaitlyn Sass performing “The Genesis and Debut of Mistress Maxine” at Defibrillator Gallery #chicago #performanceart #art (at Defibrillator Gallery)

fishingboatproceeds:

iamkiam:

Nikki S. Lee

(born Lee Seung-Hee, 1970, Korea) in her Projects, in which she spent several weeks assimilating into a cultural group and has someone take her photo within the group.  Her identities in these projects traverses age, race, and social classes.

pictured here: The Ohio Project, The Stripper Project, The Lesbian Project, The Tourist Project, The Hispanic Project, The Hip Hop Project.

I love Nikki S. Lee’s work so much.

Categories: performance art,
Mark Jeffery and Joseph Ravens concluding the IN>time performance art festival for 2013. More performance art happenings coming to Chicago soon! (at Defibrillator Gallery)

Mark Jeffery and Joseph Ravens concluding the IN>time performance art festival for 2013. More performance art happenings coming to Chicago soon! (at Defibrillator Gallery)

Categories: performance art,
Hoyun Sun’s installation for her participatory performance at Chicago Artists’ Coalition gallery for HATCH Projects: VALUE: ASSIGNED, TRANSPOSED AND IMAGINED. #chicago #art #performanceart  (at Chicago Artists’ Coalition)

Hoyun Sun’s installation for her participatory performance at Chicago Artists’ Coalition gallery for HATCH Projects: VALUE: ASSIGNED, TRANSPOSED AND IMAGINED. #chicago #art #performanceart (at Chicago Artists’ Coalition)

Trevor Martin performs “Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue” at Links Hall as part of IN>time #chicago #performanceart #art  (at Links Hall)

Trevor Martin performs “Afterword: In Search of an Epilogue” at Links Hall as part of IN>time #chicago #performanceart #art (at Links Hall)

La Ribot performed “Laughing Hole” at the Chicago Cultural Center as part of IN>time #performanceart #lol #art #chicago  (at Chicago Cultural Center)

La Ribot performed “Laughing Hole” at the Chicago Cultural Center as part of IN>time #performanceart #lol #art #chicago (at Chicago Cultural Center)

Lynn Lu performing at Defibrillator Gallery as part of the IN>time performance art festival! #gallery #performanceart #dfb #art #milk #pregnant (at Defibrillator Gallery)

Lynn Lu performing at Defibrillator Gallery as part of the IN>time performance art festival! #gallery #performanceart #dfb #art #milk #pregnant (at Defibrillator Gallery)

museumuesum:


Marina Abramovic
The Hero, 2001
Colour coupler print, 123 × 123 cm (48 1/2 × 48 1/2 in).
Abramovic dedicated ‘The Hero’ to her father, who was a soldier in World War II. Her mother was helping wounded soldiers at the front line, but at a certain moment got typhus in the middle of a battle. As the story goes, she was lying unconscious in the snow among the wounded soldiers, while Abramovic’s father was fighting the enemy with his division, retreating towards the forest where the mother was lying. Passing her on a white horse, the father saw her hair protrude from the top of the blanket. Abramovic’s mother had beautiful hair, so he stopped, dismounted his horse, and lifted the blanket. When he saw her, he immediately and without any words carried her away on his horse to unoccupied territory and left her in a village with a peasant family. Through the fog of the fever she saw his face. She stayed with the peasant family for one month while she was recovering and then she went back to the front line. One year later the wounded soldiers were coming into the improvised hospital where Abramovic’s mother was working. She recognized among them, bleeding heavily on a stretcher, Abramovic’s father. She found out that he was the same blood group as her, gave her blood for a transfusion and saved his life. Marina Abramovic was born one year later. She said about the performance: ‘After my father’s death I decided to make this work. I am sitting motionless on the white horse with a white flag blowing in the wind. I stay there for an indefinite time. The female voice is singing, from her memory, the Yugoslavian national anthem from the time of Tito. The video image is black and white because I wanted to emphasize the past and memory.’

museumuesum:

Marina Abramovic

The Hero, 2001

Colour coupler print, 123 × 123 cm (48 1/2 × 48 1/2 in).

Abramovic dedicated ‘The Hero’ to her father, who was a soldier in World War II. Her mother was helping wounded soldiers at the front line, but at a certain moment got typhus in the middle of a battle. As the story goes, she was lying unconscious in the snow among the wounded soldiers, while Abramovic’s father was fighting the enemy with his division, retreating towards the forest where the mother was lying. Passing her on a white horse, the father saw her hair protrude from the top of the blanket. Abramovic’s mother had beautiful hair, so he stopped, dismounted his horse, and lifted the blanket. When he saw her, he immediately and without any words carried her away on his horse to unoccupied territory and left her in a village with a peasant family. Through the fog of the fever she saw his face. She stayed with the peasant family for one month while she was recovering and then she went back to the front line. One year later the wounded soldiers were coming into the improvised hospital where Abramovic’s mother was working. She recognized among them, bleeding heavily on a stretcher, Abramovic’s father. She found out that he was the same blood group as her, gave her blood for a transfusion and saved his life. Marina Abramovic was born one year later. She said about the performance: ‘After my father’s death I decided to make this work. I am sitting motionless on the white horse with a white flag blowing in the wind. I stay there for an indefinite time. The female voice is singing, from her memory, the Yugoslavian national anthem from the time of Tito. The video image is black and white because I wanted to emphasize the past and memory.’